the yarn museum   Gallery/Spin Challenge #7 Poor Little Critter May 2008
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(Please take the following in the humorous spirit, albeit, possibly black humor, that it is meant.) :)

Pluckyfluff issued the following spinning challenge in her blog, and the submissions appear below. Participants had until 5.7 to spin a yarn and make a critter (see details below.) Congratulations to Eva/Atomheart, voted the winner!

For the full version of how this challenge came to be, read Lexi's blog entry.

Challenge #7- Poor Little Critter
The Reanimater Series!!

(if you haven't heard the song Poor Little Critter on the Road by The Knitters, you have to go get it and listen to it on repeat the entire time you work on this project.) Here's a sample of the lyrics:
Poor little critter on the road
where were you tryin' to go?
life's got a bucket full of woe for
the poor little critter on the road

Parameters:
For this challenge you need to pick a critter, any kind of critter, (but one that ends up as road kill will be easier for your research) and spin a yarn version of the critter as roadkill. So...the yarn can't be the live happy fluffy version of the critter (that comes later). It needs to be the version that is stuck to the shoulder of the 405, know what I mean?

After you spin the critter-as-roadkill yarn, you will turn around and try and knit/crochet the critter back together! Bring it back! Put its face back on, its tail in place, its feet (if you can find all of them) back on the legs. It's a hard task, but just do the best you can to re-animate the little guy. Then stuff it and submit pictures of it to the Yarn Museum. Bringing a critter back to life is a tall order, so this will be a lucky 13 day challenge!

The Winner of this challenge will receive Pluckyfluff's Critter as a prize.*
(*Pluckyfluff, Pluckyfluff1/blog and www.pluckyfluff.com are not responsible for any physical or psychological harm that may be incurred from contact with a reanimated critter. 1 in 200 subjects have reported strange and unpredictable behavior after reanimation resulting in bloating, skin irritation and in rare cases, death.)

The Reanimater Series
Deadline Weds. May 7th/passed

please include pictures of:
1) the type of critter you're re-animating (just pull an example off the web)
2) your materials
3) the finished yarn
4) the re-animated critter


           


    Pluckyfluff"s critter + beginning materials...for more pix, see her description.              
    handspun yarn/yarnmuseum.com              
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    See Lexi's descriptions of Squirrel 1 and Squirrel 2              
                   
    Guttersnipe/Guttersnipe Yarns

I first wanted to do a raccoon, but my partner hates raccoons and although happy to see one as road kill did not want one reanimated. So I did a squirrel. I spun in sticks and bits of gravel. Most of which fell out but the final product. I stuffed the critter with the yarn indicating the tire marks. He isn't pretty, but maybe road kill isn't supposed to be brought back from the bed. I included a pic of the yarn as road kill chili because where I grew up that's the closest most road kill go to being reanimated.
             
   

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Eva/AtomHeart

"SealTIN aka: Beater"

I chose to use a beaten seal pup for my poor critter. This little guy hadn't had a chance to swim or eat a fish before he was beat down and skinned for his fur. But he has had a second chance. I found him discarded in the sea and pulled him out and reclaimed his bloody white coat from a drunk fisherman, who had fallen asleep.
Slowly I repaired him, stitch by stitch. His fur is somewhat reattached but I haven't been able to stop the bleeding from his mouth. My son has decided he dosen't mind, and has adopted him for his own. SealTIN was the lucky one, he got another chance. 300,000 seal pups this year weren't so lucky. They were a part of the worlds largest marine mammal hunt last month.

Materials: white mill end wool, black Merino bits, red Cotswold, Romney and pure white bamboo.

             
   

             
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    Linda Scharf/Stoneleafmoon

Started out thinking of skunks, mostly because I see a lot of them, and also because I had this gorgeous white tipped black Navajo Churro. Finished the yarn before vacation, and thought I had all the time in the world to finish it, got home, got all my dates mixed up. The skunk had a premature death, then a premature re-animation, when I posted the unfinished version earlier today. My little cat was sitting outside watching me take pictures of the creature, and I could tell she was having deeply existential thoughts, wondering if that's how she, too came to exist.
             
                 
    Materials used: Navajo Churro, silk noils, remnants of one of my first handspun yarns (good for intestines!), felt fragments, mohair and marabou.
             
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